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landmark map of Lake Oconee.

Lake Oconee Guide
Click on a category link below to view a detailed list of those places located on Lake Oconee and in the surrounding areas.

Camping
Hotels, Motels, & Cabins
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Facts About Lake Oconee
Lake Oconee is one of the best largemouth bass fishing lakes in the state of Georgia. Oconee is a Creek Indian word meaning “great waters”. With an estimated 433 pounds of fish per acre, it boasts nearly double of what is normally found in other middle Georgia lakes. The figure for largemouth bass is estimated at approximately 36 pounds per acre in Lake Oconee, while typically area lakes show 12 to 15 pounds per acre.

Lake Oconee was completed in 1979 by the impoundment of the Oconee River, which is fed by the Apalachee River and Richland Creek. Georgia Power Company formed the lake to produce hydro-electric energy. The total shoreline at full pool is measured at approximately 376 miles. From its northern most flooded area, south to Wallace Dam, the distance is over 20 miles. At the widest point, Lake Oconee only measures just less than a mile across. Lake Oconee is the second largest lake located entirely in Georgia, with over 19,050 acres. Depths of up to 100 feet can be seen close to the dam, but the average depth is approximately 21 feet. Lake Oconee runs through Morgan, Greene and Putnam counties and is just north of its sister lake, Sinclair—to its south—separated only by Wallace Dam.

Because the lake is part of the Georgia Power hydro-electric system, the level is controlled and fluctuates little during the year. However, as the demand for electricity increases during the day —especially during hot weather, the water level drops approximately 18 inches. This water movement triggers largemouth bass to feed, making the fishing very attractive during that time. The baitfish, especially shad, begin to move as the water level retreats. The bass follow the baitfish. As a pump-back reservoir, water is pumped back into the lake, pulling from Lake Sinclair, causing an upstream current flow, to bring the lake level back up later in the same evening.

Structure on Lake Oconee consists of river and creek channels, ledges, submerged brush piles, standing timber, points and flats. You will find riprap, blowdowns, fallen trees, over-hanging bushes and a few weed-lines. But most of all, Lake Oconee has a multitude of docks—hundreds of docks. These docks, with their pillars and cross members, create wonderful hiding and staging places for largemouth bass. Some docks may hold a dozen or more fish. When properly approached and worked—using casts that reach the darker, shaded area of the dock, a limit can be caught in short order.

Satellite View of Lake Oconee


Lake Oconee Largemouth Bass Record


SourceGeorgia Outdoor News (GON-TV)


Lake Oconee Weather

Average Temperatures

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
High
52
55 63 73 80 85 89 88 82 73 63 54
Low 32 34 41 49 58 65 68 68 62 50 40 34

Average Rainfall
(in inches)
Year JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
110
11
9 10 8 8 9 11 9 7 6 8 10


Click here for more information on Lake Oconee and the surrounding area...
 Largemouth Bass  12-lb, 9-oz  Derell Waldrop  4/1/90






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